Before choosing a weight loss approach, it’s important to do some self-evaluation by asking yourself some questions.

What Can You Live With in the Long Term? There are many diet plans on the market today that help you lose weight. The key is finding one that doesn’t cause you stress or agony.

Ask yourself questions such as: Would the diet guidelines make you happy? Anxious? Stressed? Are you able to follow them in the long term? Factors such as enjoyment, flexibility, and longevity should be strongly considered.

If the diet is a quick fix rather than one that promotes lasting lifestyle changes, this could pose a problem. In particular, extreme diets that promise big weight loss up front aren’t always sustainable — and you may end up overeating or even binge eating if you feel deprived. Consider if the diet’s habits are ones you can continue throughout your lifetime, not just 21 or 30 days.

Consider if the diet’s habits are ones you can continue throughout your lifetime, not just 21 or 30 days.

Which diet is best for long-term weight loss?

It is important to remember that we are all very unique individuals. We all have different states of health and different lifestyles, which could affect what diet plan is best for us. That means that you should not be considering what is working for your friends or family members — and instead should pay attention to what works for you individually.

Many diet plans cut out entire food groups, which can create nutrient deficiencies as well as health problems. For instance, if the diet is very low in carbohydrates and you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, it’s probably not a good fit. And if it’s too restrictive and you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, it’s not a good idea, either. Keep in mind that pregnancy is not a time for weight loss. Speak with your doctor before making any changes to your diet if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

According to Harvard Medical School Study, “The best diet is the one we can maintain for life and is only one piece of a healthy lifestyle. People should aim to eat high-quality, nutritious whole foods, mostly plants (fruits and veggies), and avoid flours, sugars, trans fats, and processed foods (anything in a box). Everyone should try to be physically active, aiming for about two and a half hours of vigorous activity per week. For many people, a healthy lifestyle also means better stress management, and perhaps even therapy to address emotional issues that can lead to unhealthy eating patterns.”

References:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28027950/

Post comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Go top